Air Pollution Linked to Psychological Distress

Mental Health Connection Found




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Air pollution takes a toll on mental health, university of Washington researchers have concluded. By linking health data for 6,000 people to census tracts, they found that people living in areas with the highest levels of airborne fine particulate matter scored 17 percent higher in measures of psychological distress, including sadness, nervousness and hopelessness. The higher the level of particulates—emitted by car engines, fireplaces and fossil fuel power plants—the greater the impact.


This article appears in the April 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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